House at 
Khlebny

An architectural masterpiece in a high-profile Moscow neighborhood redesigned into deluxe housing.

House with 
history

In 1918, the building was a home to Robert Lockhart, the head of the British diplomatic mission, that attempted to bribe the Latvian Riflemen into treason. Arrested right in this house by order of Felix Dserschinski.

Location

  • 1st floor
    0 apartments
  • 2nd floor
    3 apartments
  • 3rd floor
    3 apartments
  • 4th floor
    3 apartments
  • 5th floor
    2 apartments
  • 6th floor
    3 apartments
  • 7th floor
    2 apartments
  • 8th floor
    2 apartments

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Design

An architectural masterpiece in a high-profile Moscow neighborhood redesigned into deluxe housing.

построен в 1913 году

House 19 at Khlebny Pereulok is a fine example of a typical pre-Revolution rental building. Designed by a renowned architect, the building features costly finishing elements and construction materials. The house was built in 1913 by the architect Piotrovicz for the house owner Baskakov. Considered a high-rise building early in the century, the house features neoclassical style, with plenty of curious architecture elements, including rounded bow window, pediment, and graphic rustication of the first two floors.

Only affluent people could afford to live in a house like that. The building became a home to rich entrepreneurs and high-rank officials.

Robert Lockhart
Robert
Lockhart

In the summer of 1918, a top-floor apartment #24 was a home to Robert Lockhart, the head of the British diplomatic mission in Moscow. By order of Felix Dserschinski, Lockhart was visited by Berzin, the commander of Latvian Riflemen that kept guard of the Kremlin. Lockhart offered Berzin big money for participating in a so-called “Conspiracy of Three Ambassadors.” Upon receiving an advance payment, Berzin took the money to V. I. Lenin. Once the conspiracy was revealed, the money was divided among the riflemen and their families.

Large spaces, high ceilings, high-profile neighborhood, and well-off residents.

During the Soviet period, House #19 at Khlebny was inhabited by the old-Moscow intelligentsia who managed to keep their apartments and embassy employees (the neighborhood was known for multiple embassies).

In the 1990s, the architectural gem got converted into an office building. As a result of a later redesign, the building recovered its original look and residential purpose. Now the house once again has elite apartments, just like it was originally planned in the early 20th century.

Today, the house at Khlebny 19 is a textbook example of how a residential building for people with the highest demands should look like:

individual storage rooms in the basement, spaсious living rooms to entertain guests, laundry rooms, concierge service, and a parking lot.

Infrastructure